Diagnostic Imaging ServicesOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Yuma District Hospital is proud to offer state-of-the-art diagnostic Imaging Services.  We strive to meet every patient and physician’s needs in diagnostic imaging and image-guided treatments.  All together the Diagnostic Imaging Services team has 156 years of experience.  The Diagnostic Imaging Services support Yuma District Hospital and Clinic’s mission statement by being dedicated to enhancing the health of all whom we serve and providing care that exceed industry quality standards.

Imaging services we provide include:

  • Diagnostic Digital X-ray
  • Computed Tomography (CT Scan)
  • MRI
  • Ultrasound-Includes Echocardiogram
  • Digital Mammography
  • Bone Density Scanning
  • Nuclear Medicine (Mobile Unit)

For general x-ray, you do not need to make an appointment.  For all other radiology exams, you must call and schedule an appointment.  Please be aware that we must have a signed physician order and any pre-certification information from your insurance company before scheduling an appointment.

For more information or to make an appointment, please call 970-848-4642

Bone Density (DXA)

Yuma District Hospital provides an in house Bone Densitometry Scanner available five days a week.  A Bone Density, or DXA, scan uses X-rays to measure how many grams of calcium and other bone minerals are packed into a segment of bone.  The test measures a specific bone, or bones, usually the spine, hip, and/or wrist.  It calculates the density of the bones and is compared with an average index based on age, sex, and size.  The resulting comparison is used to determine risk for fractures as well as the stage of osteoporosis in an individual.   

 

The National Osteoporosis Foundation indications for a DXA Scan: 

  • Women age 65 and older and men age 70 and older, regardless of risk factors.
  • Younger postmenopausal women and men age 50 to 69 about whom there is concern based on their clinical risk factor profile.
  • Women in the menopausal transition if there is a risk factor associated with increased fracture risk such as low body weight, prior low-trauma fracture or high risk medication
  • Adults who have a fracture after age 50
  • Adults with a condition (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis) or taking a medication (e.g., glucocorticoids in a daily dose ≥ 5 mg prednisone or equivalent for ≥ 3 months) associated with low bone mass or bone loss
  • Anyone being considered for pharmacologic therapy for osteoporosis
  • Anyone being treated for osteoporosis, to monitor treatment effect.
  • Anyone not receiving therapy in whom evidence of bone loss would lead to treatment
  • Postmenopausal women discontinuing

DXA scans are quick (15-20 minutes) and easy.  The patient lies still on a table as the X-ray tube moves across their body, scanning specific bones. 

If you have not had a DXA scan, ask your doctor if you would be a candidate for the exam.  A doctor’s order is needed for this exam.  

 

Computed Tomography (CT) Scan

A CT (computed tomography) scan is a noninvasive medical test which combines the diagnostic capability of x-ray with modern computer technology to create multiple detailed images of inside the body. The computer joins the images together to produce cross-sectional views of the area being studied. CT scanning is commonly used to diagnose problems such as cancers, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, trauma and musculoskeletal disorders.

Yuma District Hospital acquired a Toshiba Aquilion 80 slice scanner in 2014. This top-of-the-line CT scanner only available in three other locations in Colorado, allows physicians to simultaneously capture multiple wafer-thin images of a patient’s anatomy within seconds. The system provides exceptionally high-resolution images that help doctors to more accurately diagnose patients than ever before.  Our new scanner is equipped with radiation reduction technology to reduce your radiation exposure by seventy percent while providing a fast, safe, and reliable diagnostic tool for your provider.

Other benefits for the patient include: less time needed for breath-holds; greater flexibility (e.g., obtain thinner or thicker slices without rescanning the patient); and better cross sectional displays and 3D images. In addition, the scanner allows radiologists to use CT for new applications, such as CT angiography, and cardiology.

CT Exam Preps:

Exam With IV Contrast-(Chest/Thorax, Abdomen, Pelvis)
1. Are you diabetic?
2. Do you have a history of kidney disease?
If yes to either of these questions, you will need lab work down PRIOR
to your CT exam.
3. NOTHING TO EAT 4 HOURS PRIOR TO EXAM.

Exam with Oral Contrast
1. NOTHING TO EAT OR DRINK 4 HOURS PRIOR TO TEST.
2. Mix contrast with 24 ounces of non-carbonated beverage of choice.
3. Drink 2 HOURS PRIOR to exam-8 ounces every 30 minutes.

Yuma’s CT staff is credentialed by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists and is CT scan registered.

 

Diagnostic Imaging Services

Yuma District Hospital is proud to offer state-of-the-art diagnostic Imaging Services.  We strive to meet every patient and physician’s needs in diagnostic imaging and image-guided treatments.  All together the Diagnostic Imaging Services team has 156 years of experience.  The Diagnostic Imaging Services support Yuma District Hospital and Clinic’s mission statement by being dedicated to enhancing the health of all whom we serve and providing care that exceed industry quality standards.

Imaging services we provide include:

  • Diagnostic Digital X-ray
  • Computed Tomography (CT Scan)
  • MRI
  • Ultrasound-Includes Echocardiogram
  • Digital Mammography
  • Bone Density Scanning
  • Nuclear Medicine (Mobile Unit)

For general x-ray, you do not need to make an appointment.  For all other radiology exams, you must call and schedule an appointment.  Please be aware that we must have a signed physician order and any pre-certification information from your insurance company before scheduling an appointment.

For more information or to make an appointment, please call 970-848-4642.

 

MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

The Yuma Radiology Department provides a full spectrum of patient imaging using traditional MRI equipment. MRI scans are offered for both inpatient and
outpatients five-days-a-week.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable diagnostic test that allows radiologists to see areas of the body which cannot be seen using conventional x-rays. MRI does not use x-ray radiation. Instead, a computer creates detailed cross-sectional tissue “slice” images from data generated by a powerful magnetic field and radio waves. The computer creates 3-D images that can be viewed from any angle.

Because certain medical devices can be affected by the magnet, patients with pacemakers, defibrillators and some other implanted devices are excluded from undergoing MRI exams.

MRI is used extensively to diagnose injuries and conditions related to the brain, neck, spinal cord and soft tissues. It is also especially useful for evaluating medical conditions involving joints, muscles and bones.

MRI technology is also capable of imaging flowing blood in virtually any part of the body. This allows technicians to perform studies that show the arterial system in the body, but not the surrounding tissue. In many cases, the MRI system can do this without a contrast injection, as is required in vascular radiology. To enhance certain other types of diagnostic studies, however, a contrast medium may be injected into a vein.

During your exam, which may take 20 minutes to an hour, you lie on a movable table inside the scanner. Because the scanner makes loud knocking noises while it takes pictures, you may be given earplugs or headphones with music to lessen the sound. Patients utilizing the traditional MRI scanner sometimes experience claustrophobia. Medications are available to help. If you are wearing anything metallic, such as jewelry, dentures, eyeglasses, or hearing aids that might interfere with the MRI scan, we will ask you to remove them.

 

MRI Preps:
Abdomen Exam:
1. Please do not eat or drink anything after midnight before your exam.

All of Yuma’s MRI technologists are credentialed by the American Registry of
Radiologic Technologists.

 

Ultrasound

Yuma District Hospital is proud to provide top of the line Ultrasound equipment, brand new and installed May 2013.  An Ultrasound exam, or sonogram, uses no radiation. With the aid of a computer, ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to create diagnostic images.
Ultrasound exams are safe and generally non-invasive procedures. During the exam, a transducer that emits inaudible sound waves is placed on your body. The sound waves are reflected back to the transducer (like sonar) and are translated into a moving image by a computer. This technology makes it possible to view the movement of internal organs in motion, such as a fetus during pregnancy or the flow of blood through a blood vessel.

Ultrasound is especially useful for providing information about abdominal organs such as the kidneys, liver, pancreas and gallbladder, as well as the breasts, uterus, ovaries, prostate and thyroid gland.  It is also used to view heart wall/valve motion and blood flow to look for narrowing of blood vessels to screen for stroke risk, and look for enlarged arteries to diagnose an aneurysm. Ultrasound is an excellent way to look for blood clots in the veins/arteries of the legs or arms.

Ultrasound is a quick and relatively inexpensive procedure. We work with a highly trained ultrasound technologist who is credentialed, which means they have special ultrasound training and have passed a national examination.

Echocardiograms
 An echocardiogram is an ultrasound examination of how the heart valves and muscle walls are working. If the cardiologist needs additional information, an echo stress test may be ordered. This would include an ultrasound examination of the heart at rest, then a treadmill stress test, followed by a stress ultrasound of the heart.  YDH offers Echocardiograms on Mondays.

 

Preps for Ultrasound:

    Abdominal exams-
No food or water after midnight before exam.
A light evening meal is suggested with no carbonated beverages.  A light evening meal means: No gassy foods like beans, broccoli, brussel sprouts.

    Renal exams-
No food or water after midnight before exam.
A light evening meal is suggested with no carbonated beverages.  A light evening meal means: No gassy foods like beans, broccoli, brussel sprouts.

    OB exams-
FINISH drinking 32 ounces of water only, no coffee, etc.
DO NOT USE RESTROOM BEFORE EXAM.
It is very important that the bladder is full for this exam.

    Pelvic exams-
DRINK 32 OUNCES OF FLUID/WATER ONE HOUR PRIOR TO EXAM.
DO NOT USE RESTROOM BEFORE EXAM.
It is very important that the bladder is full for this exam.

 

Digital and Computed Radiography (X-ray)

Yuma District Hospital provides a full range of diagnostic x-ray procedures utilizing state of the art technology including Digital and Computed Radiography (CR) to provide detailed images to assist the Radiology team in detecting changes in body tissues, bone injuries or organ abnormalities.

Portable fluoroscopy and x-ray equipment are used during surgical procedures and is available for use in Yuma’s Emergency and Surgery Departments.Diagnostic Radiology employs general imaging techniques for both inpatients and outpatients. Digital Radiography uses much less radiation compared to conventional and CR Radiography and is less time consuming.  When using x-ray, a part of the body is exposed to a small amount of radiation to produce an image of the anatomy of interest. The common use of routine x-ray imaging is to diagnose injury to the bone, bone diseases and infections, and osteoarthritis. X-ray imaging is also useful to view internal organs. Procedures can take from just a few minutes to several hours and include initial screenings as well as sophisticated and complex procedures. Diagnostic Radiographs or digital fluoroscopy can also be used to view the gastrointestinal or genitourinary organs. Digital fluoroscopy is an imaging technique which uses x-rays and a fluorescent screen to obtain moving, real-time images of the internal structures of the body. These moving images are shown on a T.V. like screen. Fluoroscopy is commonly used to study movement inside the body, such as the function of the stomach and intestines and is also used for special diagnostic studies of the spine and joints.